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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
display at the smithsonian in d.c. and the california science center in los angeles. >>> also another story we want to bring you out of florida. just check this out. unwelcome visitor at a picnic area in the everglades. look at that. family on vacation from arkansas took this video after a 17-foot burmese python was shot and killed by park rangers. the giant snakes, many of them former pets, have become a big, big, big nuisance in south florida. next month florida game officials will hold a hunting contest offering a $15,000 prize to the person who kills the most pythons. >>> all right, let's turn from snakes to flakes. the massive storm that's been causing huge problems since christmas day is finally over. maine was the last to deal with it. some places got a foot of fresh snow, but it's not over yet. meteorologist chad myers is in the cnn weather center with a look at that. so chad, you know, i thought when this storm came through, all right, fine. it wasn't so great. lots of snow. >> right. >> but it's over. not over yet. >> no, not over yet. and another one coming on its heels. an
't it their deficit in large part deficit? >> of course, but they have political amnesia. ideology is the science of idiots. here's one of these moments where when you live inside the box and refuse to look at empirical evidence, refuse to understand history to show us how economies work, how tax cuts or increases affect populations, then they are going to follow this line of idiocy over their own, i think, political cliff. and the partisanship is going to wreak tremendous havoc on the republican party in the upcoming elections. >> we have limited time. i want to go back to john harwood. is there a time here, john, when we're going to see the markets start to react or are we expecting most traders to wait until after the first to make big decisions? >> i think that's when they reacted. if we go over the cliff, even for a couple of days, you're going to see a reaction. i think at the end of the day you will see action if we go over the cliff for a couple of days, because i don't agree with jonathan that they are immune to public opinion. it is going to take a while for it to kick in. a lot of the
of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
. that is in the art, science times, style -- it means basically telling you how to live. when it becomes cultural criticism, it is telling you what opera to go to or whether "the nutcracker" is good. it turns out we know from surveys that people read a great deal more about health than they used to. people are reading the newspaper to find out how to take care when your elderly parents -- what happens when your foot falls asleep, if you go to a place 15,000 feet high you should take pills because somebody might drop dead, which happens to one of my colleagues. people are reading more for that. that is what they call value added journalism -- i call it how to live journalism. one thing about these extra sesections -- to sell something other than the record. -- the "times" used to have one page a week. one page a week. now think about the "times" and what it is -- it is highly different. the other thing they're doing better -- cultural criticism. i talked about with one member of the audience -- cultural criticism used to be really what might be called culture in new york. now it is every kind of c
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer on facebook. ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you.
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. be
the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] yes, it is. restore revive rejuvenate rebuild rebuild rebuild >>> that's all for us at "outfront" tonight. erin is back next week and we'll be following all of the late breaking developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations which it will be a working weekend in washington. have a great weekend and a happy new year. "piers morgan" is next. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup fro
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to employees made public today, shuttle says rather than be bystanders, you and your customers have an opportunity and i believe we all have a responsibility, to send our elected officials a respectful but poten
♪ green giant >>> anyone who loves to spend time at san francisco's science museum is moving to pier 15. the last day it will be in its current location on lion street will be january 2. but it takes a lot of time to relocate so many exhibits. the exploretorium will reopen in the new home april 17. it is already a happy holiday season for the oakland zoo. it received a 1 million-dollar donation from someone who wants to remain anonymous. there are no restrictions on how the money can be spent. zoo executives call it the greatest gift they have ever received. especially welcome after last month's election after voters rejected a partial tax to help support the zoo. >>> jerry garcia would sing, if the thunder doesn't get you, the lightning will. >> i woke up and i thought here we go. >> kind of came out of the blue, i thought. >> yes. and we had a few areas isolated, thunderstorms and hail reported in some spots. and that is pushing to the east into the central valley. that is the front moving into the mountains. where the sierra will be getting it, already beginning to see the snowfall.
on a road trip through los angeles to get to the california science center where it's now on display. and now the shuttle "atlantis" is taking its place in history without traveling anywhere. cnn's john zarrella is at the kennedy space center. hey, john. >> reporter: hey, candy. you're right, "atlantis" is really the only one of the shuttles that didn't have to take wing to get to its future museum landing site. "atlantis" in november literally just went ten miles down the road from the vehicle assembly building here to the visitor complex. for the viewers out there saying, where is it? that's it right there behind me. that is "atlantis." and it is completely wrapped in shrink wrap. why is that? because they are building the facility, the museum around the shuttle. so it's quiet here now. but i have to tell you, all day today, the workmen were just hammering and they're putting up scaffolding and they're finishing this up by july when the grand opening will be. in march, they're going to actually unwrap "atlantis" when most of the work will be done then. but you can see it's on a 45-
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)